Great Rail Sites Volume 3: The Trackside Photographer

Since becoming a rail-fan in 2008 and starting Legacies On The Rails 5 years ago this month, and through the hobby of and process known as rail-fanning for me has mostly been focused on watching trains, and driving by rail-yards looking for that next great pic and/or video of a locomotive, a Heritage Unit, or other piece of “Fallen Flag” equipment or something I had not caught before. Visiting rail museums, locomotive, or caboose displays, depots (or depot/rail museums) and riding and recording various excursion trains. You’ll recall that in August, 2015 the Legacies On The Rails Art Show took place at Cathy Kline‘s art studio at the CB&Q Depot in Parkville, Missouri.

Now, I did start the Facebook Page Railroad Bridges: Related Photos & Video. I do take pics of a grade crossing, or signals here and there, and honestly, some of my favorite pics, be they mine or by another rail-fan, are those in which the equipment is passing under signal towers. I take pics of the buildings at the crossings that tell which railroad they belong to, and have the mile-post marker, and often a phone number to call to report crossing emergencies. I am always looking for more Facebook Groups to share these pics on.

But in hind-sight, I don’t feel like I ever gave that much time in thought about the Railroad Landscape itself which is what our featured site today is all about, which is The Trackside Photographer.

Since March of 2016, thetracksidephotographer.com has focused on 24 different categories that you will find clearly listed on their website, and as is stated in their Mission Statement, focuses on what is along the tracks…..not on the tracks. This is clearly just as important to what makes up railroads past and present as any of the topics I have been focusing on.

The Trackside Photographer publishes a new article every Thursday and they are always looking for more photographer/authors to submit work for publication within certain guidelines, that are also accessible in their website. You can submit your work to them at tracksidephotographer@embarqmail.com .

Some of the topics covered on The Trackside Photographer are: Bridges-like John Marvig‘s July 2012 piece: The Kate Shelley High Bridge. Freight Houses-like David Kahler‘s 2016 piece: Standing Tall. Grade Crossings-like Ed Fuller‘s August, 2016 piece from The Editor’s Notebook. Grain Elevators-like Eric Gagnon‘s June,2016 piece: Wheat Filled Wonders. Interlocking Towers. Maintenance Of Way. Signs. Signals-like Carl Smith‘s 6/15/17 piece: Two Hundred Miles And Counting. Stations, and much more!

So, be sure to check out The Trackside Photographer today on their website as well as on Facebook! As I’ve been famous for saying for years: You’ll be glad ya’ did!

 

This Edition’s Railroad Equipment Profile is this Missouri Pacific Caboose that I photographed recently in Buckner, Missouri, #11078. The 11000 Series Cabooses were used by Missouri Pacific for yard and transfer service. After December, 1982, Mo-Pac had 651 cabooses, including 407 bay-window, 208 cupola, and 36 transfer models. They were assigned Class CA-19 through Class CA-35 designations. 11078 is one of the CA-19 Class. # 11078 is one of several built by T&P in Marshall, Texas in 1955, and  rebuilt in Sedalia, Mo 1966-1971. It was removed from service 10/15/84 at Sedalia. Thanks to Utahrails.net for this information.

As always, though trains are fun, and have a lifetime of history and heritage behind them, nothing on earth can compare to a relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ and I hope that you have accepted him as your Personal Lord & Savior and are actively following His leading through His word, prayer, and fellowship in a local church. If you have not, I hope you will accept his free gift of salvation today!

And when it comes to trains, the Railroad Landscape and everything that is railroading, that you continue leaving Legacies…On The Rails!

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