Tag Archives: CBS

The Railroad Hour Takes Us Back In Time

Welcome One, Welcome All! My goodness, 10 Legacies…On The Rails postings already here in 2017 compared to only 4 for the whole year of 2016? Getcha’ Some O’ That! I am planning, likely next week to start updating some of my other blog sites here on WordPress.com including Sports…Live With The Losh-Man and Cool Cars USA! Since I now have an hour to kill between the time I get off on weekday afternoons and the time I walk the half a block to the garage my wife and I park her car in as we work directly across the street from each other, it should be easy to rotate blogs on a daily or every few days basis! I even have some other blog ideas in mind, but I won’t spoil the surprise, oh no, you will simply have to wait and see!

So, in my last posting, I started featuring episodes of Railroad Related Old Time Radio. Well, what we are going to discuss today was not as much radio related except for its name and who its sponsor was, but I still think even with those two things alone, and the fact that it is still Old Time Radio, one of my favorite forms of entertainment (especially if I need something soothing on those nights I may have trouble falling or getting back to sleep, or something soothing to work by.)

RRHR.jpg

It’s The Railroad Hour. You can still find the 104 Episodes by checking out the link

The Railroad Hour was sponsored by the Association of American Railroads. See it at:
https://www.aar.org/. The association was founded October 10th, 1934 (another great connection for me as my only sibling, my Sister was born in October.) and is still in existence today, headquartered in Washington, DC, which is also where my firstborn, my Son John works: not for the AAR, but in Washington DC.

The Railroad Hour first ran on CBS starting (you guessed it, October 4th,1948) with Marvin Miller as the Announcer, Warren Barker as Chief Engineer and Gordon Macrae starring in what was billed as the World’s Greatest Musical Comedies along with a host of many other well known stars of the period. It was later reduced to 30 minutes on 04/25/1949 and it continued until 09/26/1949. It was later moved to NBC on 10/3/1949 where it ran until 6/21/1954. On both CBS and NBC it had been a Monday evening headliner, from 8pm Eastern/7pm Central time.

The Railroad Hour’s theme song was :”I’ve Been Working On The Railroad“, the ever popular American folk song first published as “The Levee Song” in Calmina Princetonia an 1894 book of Princeton University songs. The song’s earliest recording was by Sandhills Sixteen by Victor Records in 1927.

Railroad.net has a chat forum on The Railroad Hour. Martin Grams has written a book on it that can be found at his official website http://martingrams.biz/books-2/the-railroad-hour/ .The Modesto Radio Museum in Modesto,California‘s site has an article about it:
http://www.modestoradiomuseum.org/railroad%20hour.html . The O Gauge Railroading Online Forum has some postings about it. http://ogrforum.ogaugerr.com/topic/old-time-radio-the-railroad-hour-1 .Ebay offers all the episodes on an MP3 DVD. 104 or more of the episodes can be found on You Tube. Many, if not all the episodes are available from Amazon.

Altogether, what you have here between all these is enough to keep any Railfan, Old Time Radio Fan (or maybe you are both) entertained for many, many hours!

And, don’t forget to check out my many Railroad related Facebook Communities:

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad (Burlington Route)

Railroad Bridges, Related Photos & Video

Fans Of The Kansas City Terminal Railway

Rail Box Freight Car Fans

Union Pacific Flag Units

Railroad Auto Racks

The Wabash Cannonball

Caterpillar Train Collectors

I continue to invite my many railfan buddies on Facebook to post their pics and videos on these pages, so I am issuing the same invitation to you. I also search You Tube on a regular basis, copying and pasting links to those videos that qualify on these pages. I always of course, let those who took the videos know that I am sharing their work on the pages as well. Stay tuned for more pages to be created in the future!

Oh, this weekend I am actually getting an 8X8 HO Scale layout. I am buying it from my longtime friend, brother in Christ and up the street neighbor Will James. He has had it a few years but never did anything with it, so I get to take a shot at it. I admit I have zero clue what I am doing, but have some folks I can likely call for help. I will post pics next time and keep you posted. But in the interim, here is a video of it that I took when he first got it:

This Edition’s Railroad Equipment Profile is

14089207_10153884775577749_2665249458153750993_n.jpg

The Missouri, Kansas, Texas Railroad Transfer Caboose #5  M930 that runs on the Midland Railway in Baldwin City, Kansas https://www.midlandrailway.org/ that my girls and I rode last Fall. I just now found am HO Scale version of it with Bluford Shops that I eventually HAVE to have. I don’t find equipment I have either  photographed, had in my videos or even been on, at such a reasonable price. Check out the following link at: http://www.modeltrainstuff.com/Bluford-Shops-HO-Transfer-Caboose-MKT-p/blu-35050.htm
But I hope that the most important thing in your life remains pursuing a relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ. He has been and will always be the only way to have a secure eternity. John 14:6 says “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No man comes to the Father but by me.” If you have not accepted Him as your personal Lord & Savior, don’t let this train leave the station without you! He is the only way to truly stay “on track”!

Until next time, continue leaving Legacies…On The Rails! And if I don’t see you out railfanning, if I don’t see you here, I hope I will see you….In The Air!

Advertisements

Revisiting History: Trains Of The Civil War

Welcome back to Legacies…On The Rails! This is my 9th installment for 2017 as we keep rolling down the tracks toward Spring! Today, we will be discussing trains and railroads of the American Civil War. First let me say that these days, I know some find it offensive to discuss any part of our nation’s history that they find suddenly uncomfortable. Well, I find that fact offensive because those who deny, try to blot out or do not understand or learn from history are doomed to repeat it. I will not apologize for visiting this topic and as a matter of a fact, the phrase I personally coined some time ago is: If you don’t understand where you’ve been, you do not truly understand where you are, or where you are going, or why.

I will never dishonor the memory of my ancestors (or yours) that put themselves in harm’s way or even lost their lives generally serving in our armed forces or fighting in any of the battles that have made our nation what it is, by avoiding study of, or discussion of these periods.Denial cannot erase historical facts. I actually make it a daily point to go out of my way to approach and thank any of our active duty military or those wearing their Veteran caps, jackets, etc. Have you thanked a Veteran today? The freedoms we enjoy as Americans are not free. I love the saying these days that only two have offered, or died for you, Jesus Christ, and our American Military! May God continue to bless and keep our Heroes! And though it may be your “right”, those who are choosing not to stand for the presentation of our Nation’s Flag and the National Anthem……you are dishonoring those who have or are currently fighting for your protection, and spitting on the graves of those that have died fighting for you. You disgust me!

Some do not realize just how vital the railroads were in the tumultuous years of the Civil War. Not only in the transportation of men and goods, but in the eventual defeat of the South. The Confederacy simply did not have the financial or material means to adequately maintain the railroads in their area. They only controlled 9,000 miles of trackage, while the North controlled 20,000 miles.

It also did not help that Northern troops were in the regular habit of burning or otherwise destroying rail bridges, (which, though I certainly do not condone slavery then or now, and understand the necessity, as the creator of the Facebook page Railroad Bridges, Related Photos & Video is kind of sad for me to think about). They were also in the habit of pulling up tracks, heating them until they would bend and tying them around trees, creating what was known as “Sherman’s Neckties“. The Union blockades of sea routes also kept the South from being able to obtain vital supplies to maintain the railroads. This all combined to keep Confederates from being able to ship their cotton crop, so they could not woo the help of European nations.

Unemployment rose in southern states as they had to let go of so many railroad workers. Confederates also usually destroyed as much of a town’s rail equipment as possible before retreats were done. I was actually shocked to see that in the beginning of the Civil War, the Confederacy actually controlled 135 railroads. But also in the beginning, in both southern and northern areas, most railroads were short lines that did not connect with continuing tracks, which made truly long distance rail transport difficult.

The Civil War was also the first time that a train mounted gun was ever created and employed, and the first time that train cars were used as makeshift hospitals. Both would continue into the two World Wars.

But fortunately for both sides, though the Confederacy still eventually fell, with the decline of their railroads playing such a huge role, in 1862 President Abraham Lincoln signed into law the Pacific Railway Act, authorizing construction of the Transcontinental Railroad. The Union Pacific built west from Omaha, Nebraska and the Central Pacific Railroad built East from Sacramento, California. The finalization of the Transcontinental Railroad was culminated with a ceremony on May 10th, 1869 as the two lines met in the
city of Promontory, Utah. When President Lincoln drove the Golden Spike to complete the line, it was attached to a telegraph wire that sent the news from coast to coast. It was the spike that was heard around the world. Four more transcontinental roads and 174 million acres for them eventually came to be authorized as well.

Here are a couple of my current reads on this subject at the moment. Nothing Like It In The World: The Men Who Built The Transcontinental Railroad on Amazon at:
https://www.amazon.com/Nothing-Like-World-Transcontinental-1863-1869/dp/0743203178 and The Union Pacific: Birth Of A Railroad check it out at the link:
https://www.amazon.com/Union-Pacific-Railroad-1862-93-Hardcover/dp/B00IGYPKXO/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1488725961&sr=1-1&keywords=Union+Pacific+Birth+Of+A+Railroad .

Probably the most famous American Civil War related railroad story is that of the theft by Union Soldiers and Civilian Scout James J Andrews in Northern Georgia April 12, 1862 of the steam 4-4-0 locomotive known as The General. It was built by Rogers, Ketchum & Grovesner in New Jersey. Part of my personal railroads collection are items related to The General. I have also been to the Walt Disney Hometown Museum in Marceline, Missouri https://www.waltdisneymuseum.org/ (Disney was a huge railfan) and even have friends that are from Marceline. and other friends that have worked the railroads that pass through it. There is a room in the museum almost entirely dedicated the Disney movie The Great Locomotive Chase. I also just purchased the movie on my Google Play Movies collection.

Here is a song about the chase by Robert W Smith that I also found on You Tube:

While the Disney film that starred Fess Parker (Davey Crockett) and Jeffrey Hunter who was the Captain Christopher Pike in the very first Star Trek Pilot: The Cage, was released June 8th, 1956 (cool for me as both my Mother Maureen Losh and my Son John W Losh III were both born in June), there was an earlier version called The General that starred Buster Keaton and Clyde Bruckman, that was released February 5th, 1927 (again cool for me, I was born in February).

I thought of posting the entire lists, but instead I am going to encourage you to do searches on Railroads Of The Civil War as well as books on the same.

I may do a later blog expanding further on this topic but I think we are off to a good start here. Hope you have enjoyed these beginning tidbits of info, and the videos I found and shared about Trains Of The Civil War.

I am going to start a couple new features that will continue from here on in the Legacies…On The Rails Blog and maybe even the Podcast.

The first is a Railroad Equipment Profile. In this feature, I will share pics I have taken of locomotives, freight cars, grain cars, tankers, cabooses, etc and their origins.

14317381_10153927125867749_7998085926530521894_n

This first installment Of my new Railroad Equipment Profile features the Dome Car Prairie View (Great Northern Railroad Empire Builder #1394 that I recently caught at the Kansas City Union Station. The following information on it’s credit goes to Trainweb.org.

Prairie View” – to BN 3/70 (same number), to Amtrak 9364. Was eventually used as an Amtrak parts car and was sold 5/93 as a shell (less trucks) to the BN. Stored Springfield MO (ex Frisco shops) until sold 1994 to Holland America Westours. After putting over $1m into it, car is now in service in Alaska. It carries the name “Deshka” and entered service in 1997. In 2003 Westours put all but 3 of their Budd domes up for sale as `”excess”. They kept 1394 because it required no coupler pocket modifications for the new Colorado Railcar domes and it has Budd braked trucks (from under one of the two 1956 Budd built Santa Fe business cars that were retrucked with 4 wheel trucks in 1989). Car transferred late 2004 to a new division called Alaska Rail Tours (defunct) with the other retained cars to begin service in 2005 in a non “cruise ship” travel/tour operation in Alaska. Sold 10/09 to Iowa Pacific/San Luis & Rio Grande. Renamed back to original “Prairie View”.

The Second is Railroad Old Time Radio. Anyone that knows me knows that I love old movies, old TV shows, and the radio versions of many of them. We will begin with Episode 17 of Gunsmoke. Set in Dodge City, Kansas, it was billed as the first adult western, and its radio show that starred William Conrad as Marshall Matt Dillon first aired on CBS on April 26th, 1952. (Again, cool for me as both the first date Anniversary and Wedding Anniversary for my wife Denise and I are both in late April (25th/28th respectively). This episode aired September 27th, 1952. My daughter Cara Losh was also born on a much later September 27th. I am loving these connections as I am not a believer in coincidence! Hope you enjoy it. We may start sharing Railroad Movies as well (which I kind of already did by sharing The General with Buster Keaton above.)

Thanks again for joining me! until next time, I want to again encourage you to accept the free gift of Salvation and forgiveness that the Lord Jesus Christ offers you and to follow Him each day of your life. My reading this morning with breakfast was in Romans 9-12 and the verses that stood out to me were Romans 10: 14,15 (NKJV from Bible Gateway)

14 How then shall they call on Him in whom they have not believed? And how shall they believe in Him of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear without a preacher? 15 And how shall they preach unless they are sent? As it is written:“How beautiful are the feet of those who preach the gospel of peace, Who bring glad tidings of good things!”

Well, if I don’t see you down the rail line, if I don’t see you here, I pray I’ll see you In The Air!