Tag Archives: Union Pacific

Let’s Look At The Possibilities

In my last posting, I mentioned that my family and I were about to embark on a two week vacation that will have us trekking across several states and that it should provideo ample opportunities for railfanning. We have now been on this trip since last Friday at 3:15pm CT.

I thought I would share links to train rides/museums in the different states we will be crossing, that some of are possibilities for us to be able to experience. I was going to just write out the list for each state, where each is located, etc but that would take for-ever.

We’ll begin with Illinois, where the freight railroads are the same as they are here in Kansas City, Missouri. They include BNSF, CSX, CanadIan Pacific, Canadian National, Kansas City Southern, Norfolk Southern and Union Pacific.

http://www.idot.illinois.gov/transportation-system/Network-Overview/rail-system/index

https://www.american-rails.com/ilns.html

Next up is Indiana. The major freight railroads are Canadian National, Canadian Pacific, CSX and Norfolk Southern, though there are many other short line freight roads in use as well.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Indiana_railroads

https://indyschild.com/train-trips-near-indiana/

Next in our rail lineup is Ohio. There, the major freight roads are Canadian National, CSX and Norfolk Southern.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ohio_railroads

http://www.onlyinyourstate.com/ohio/epic-train-rides-oh/

We then cross into Pennsylvania. The major freight railroads there are CSX and Norfolk Southern.

http://www.onlyinyourstate.com/pennsylvania/epic-train-rides-pa/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Pennsylvania_railroads

Next, we spend a very brief drive in West Virginia. Again, the major freight railroads are CSX and Norfolk Southern.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_West_Virginia_railroads

http://www.onlyinyourstate.com/west-virginia/epic-train-rides-wv/

We then arrive in Maryland, where we stayed at the Comfort Inn Gold Coast in Ocean City. Here, the major freight railroads are Canadian Pacific and CSX.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Maryland_railroads

https://www.american-rails.com/mldds.html

Afterward we move on to Virginia, where my youngest Brother In Law’s family live in Vienna, and my Son lives in Fairfax. The major freight railroads are Canadian Pacific, CSX and Norfolk Southern.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Virginia_railroads

http://www.onlyinyourstate.com/virginia/trains-va/

In previous trips out there, we have also spent time in Delaware and New York. Here are some train rides info for the two of them.

In Delaware, we are back to the major freight railroads being CSX and Norfolk Southern.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Delaware_railroads

http://www.wwrr.com/

In New York, we have the bigger group of major freight railroads of Canadian National, Canadian Pacific, CSX, and Norfolk Southern.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_New_York_railroads

https://www.american-rails.com/new-york-train-rides.html

I hope that if you have not accepted Jesus Christ as your Personal Lord & Savior, and are you are continuing to follow Him every day of your life. And when it comes to trains and everything that is railroading, that you continue leaving Legacies…On The Rails!

September Is Busy Railfan Month In Missouri And Kansas

The month of September, 2017 was an active one for me as far as rail-fanning goes. It began on Labor Day Monday 9/4/17 as my wife, daughter and I went to visit the Grinter Sunflower Farm located just west of Kansas City in the city of Lawrence, Kansashttp://www.kansascity.com/entertainment/article170172727.html It is famous for its vast stretch of large sunflowers. We then walked around in Downtown Lawrence and caught this Prairie 2-6-2 Santa Fe #1073 on display.
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Then after  having lunch at Noodles & Company, we headed to the Lawrence Amtrak Station.https://www.amtrak.com/servlet/ContentServerpagename=am/am2Station/Station_Page&code=LRC There, I was able to take pics of the interior and exterior of the building but also caught Amtrak P42DC Engines # 174 & 200 that pulled into the station with several passenger cars behind them just seconds after I arrived. They were there only minutes before pulling out again, which I also caught.

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The Kansas Pacific Railroad opened a line from Kansas City to Lawrence, Kansas in 1864. According to the Kansas Historical Society, the first locomotive to operate south of the Kaw River, the “Ottawa” crossed it in Lawrence  November 1st, 1867. To qualify for bonds, the Leavenworth, Lawrence And Galveston Railroad had to lay track from Lawrence to Ottawa by January 1st, 1868. It was completed just one day ahead of the deadline.

Next up was a Sunday 9/10/17 visit to the city of Mulberry, Kansas where my Father-In-Law Bill Mapes grew up and where his father William R Mapes Sr and some of my Father-In-Law’s brothers worked (and one still does) for the Kansas City Southern Railroad. We had been invited to attend a birthday party at the home of Denise’s Aunt Connie Bright. While I was there, I visited a couple of local crossings (shown in pics below) but missed a couple of trains that came through.

Mulberry (formerly known as Mulberry Grove: again according to the KS Historical Society) was founded in 1866 by N.W. Taylor and was originally on the Cherryvale Division of the Kansas City, Fort Scott & Gulf Railroad.

On our way back to Kansas City, we passed through nearby Arcadia as well as Fort Scott, Kansas where I took these pics.

Arcadia, Kansas began as Hathaway, after its founder Phil Wing Hatahway in 1857 (later changed to ArcadiaRural Beauty” at the suggestion of Hathaway‘s sweetheart from Chicago. The story of how present day Arcadia was established is through the legend of the “Nighttime Post Office Switch.” It involved the railroad being extended from Fort Scott to the coal fields of Crawford County, missing Old Arcadia by about 1/25 mile. The coal company put in a coal loading switch, naming it Finley after Captain George Finley who helped build the station. Where mailbags were picked up and dropped off later led to a post office getting the name of Arcadia rather than Finley literally overnight.

The next time I had a weekday off with no other plans, I finally made it to one of the many Missouri towns I had been meaning to visit (as far as rail-fanning goes), as I used to attend weekly sales meetings there when I was in toner cartridge sales with Laser Supercharge back in the early 2000’s, Pleasant Hill. The Missouri Pacific Depot there was constructed in 1903. Like other cities in the KC area, such as Parkville, Lee’s Summit, and Weston, in addition to displaying many original railroad artifacts, the depot is also the current office of the Pleasant Hill Chamber Of Commerce. Pleasant Hill (that started on a bet according to local historian Jeff Wilson (that I was introduced to by Tina from the Chamber Of Commerce) was originally platted in 1844 and was moved to its current location when the railroad was built through, in 1865.

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Jeff owns two local businesses, Resto 101 and Retro On The Rails (and that one is also located in the Depot building. Check out both on Facebook. I felt like a celebrity as once Tina introduced me to Jeff, I was allowed tours of Retro On The Rails as well as the Bally Peddler next to it that were not even open that day. I promised to return with my family some weekend as these businesses are only open Thursday thru Saturday. I also offered to help in any way I can with any railroad related special events they hold in the future. I caught two Union Pacific trains, one likely a grainer and the other a mixed freight (and appropriately enough it even had some Missouri Pacific gondolas in the manifest. )
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Next up was Blue Springs, Missouri after I attended a Kansas City Chiefs Red Friday Pep Rally hosted by Community America Credit Union on Friday 9/15/17. I caught a Kansas City Southern train headed through town with two Gray Ghost locomotives on point as the downtown area was just opening its Fall Festival.

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Here is another episode of a railroad related Old Time Radio Show
https://www.oldtimeradiodownloads.com/crime/calling-all-detectives/calling-all-detectives-48-10-14-286-suicide-on-the-great-valley-railroad

Here is a recent posting from our friend Nick Ozorak and The Roundhouse Podcast:

Today’s Railroad Equipment Profile is this box car from the Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad that I found on the south side of the North Kansas City, Missouri/Avondale, Missouri Norfolk Southern Yard
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Here is what Wikepedia had to say about the Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad

The Texas, Oklahoma and Eastern Railroad (reporting mark TOE) is a Class III short-line railroad headquartered in De Queen, Arkansas.

TOE operates a 39.8 mile line in Oklahoma from the Arkansas state line (where it interchanges with De Queen and Eastern Railroad, an affiliate with whom it shares its headquarters) to Valliant, Oklahoma (where it interchanges with Kiamichi Railroad).

TOE traffic generally consists of forest products. TOE was incorporated in 1910.

Hope you have enjoyed this look at my September In Railfanning, sorry it took me so long to get around to it. I’m actually disappointed that though I have more than ample time to work on it these past three weeks, I just couldn’t get motivated. It’s a long story, but it got done in the end. I’ll get you up to speed on October and November soon.

But, for now, I’m John Losh, “The Losh-Man“. And, as I always do, I want to remind you to follow the Lord Jesus Christ with all your heart each day of your life, and when it comes to trains and everything that is railroading, continue leaving Legacies…On The Rails!

 

Presidential Trains Take Us Back In Time

A few weeks ago, our family was planning a trip to San Antonio, Texas to watch my youngest brother-in-law’s youngest Son graduate  Basic Training for the National Guard. None of us were able to get enough time off for that distance, and as  is often the case, I was unable to get any of the time off, so  instead my girls chose to travel to Omaha, Nebraska for the weekend. Since I was not along for the trip, and I know rail-fanning can get old for those that are not “into it”, I really did not expect them to do anything train related.

But wouldn’t you know it, they stayed at the Sure Stay Plus at 305 N Fort Crook Rd, directly across from active railroad tracks, and among other places, they visited the  Omaha Union Station, taking pics of several pieces of equipment from models to real, steam to diesel. Those units included Union Pacific 4504 (SD70M), UP 5733 (AC4400CW), UP 6053 (AC4400CW), UP 7370 (ES44AC). Union Pacific CA-8 Class Caboose 25559 built October, 1964 (the year my Paternal Grandfather passed away) and retired 08/11/1986. Union Pacific Steam #1243 (4-6-0 built October, 1890 at Cooke Locomotive & Steamworks. A model of UP steam 9000 (102 foot long, 782,000 lb coal burning prototype 4-12-2 built 1926-1930: the real one  is on display at the Los Angeles County Fairplex in Pomona, California. They also caught a ‘Fallen Flag” in a Southern Pacific Box car, that along with an ADM Tanker and lots of assorted covered hoppers, were on a mixed manifest.

The Sure Stay Plus is also unique in the fact that all the rooms are named after various United States Presidents. They stayed in the Warren G Harding Room.

As I am trying to be more diverse in what I bring to you, the readers here on Legacies…On The Rails, it got me thinking as I not only love trains, but I love history, so Presidents….and Trains…..Hmmmm! So let’s look at some connections of our Presidents and Trains, starting with the aforementioned Warren G Harding.

Built in 1911, The Superb was President Harding’s personal Pullman railroad car in his cross country tour in 1923. It was that year that he drove the final spike completing the Alaska RailroadThe Superb is the 2nd oldest steel private car in existence. The Superb had also been used by President Woodrow Wilson. It also carried President Harding‘s body from San Francisco to Washington DC by way of the Southern Pacific and the B&O Railroad. after his death on 08/02/1923. He had traveled hoping to improve his health and his image with the American people as his administration was was plagued with scandal in The Tea Pot Dome.  But high blood pressure, an enlarged heart, pnuemonia and an obvious stroke (though many speculated as  to a heart attack or food poisoning, even trying to cast guilt on Mrs. Harding or the Mob)  took his life. Mrs. Harding did not allow an autopsy of the President’s body. The Superb was temporarily renamed Pope Pius XI for his train from New York City to Chicago.  The Superb  was later an office car for the Charleston & West Carolina, Atlantic Coast Line, Seaboard Coast Line railroads.

The Superb was donated to the Southeastern Railway Museum in Duluth, Georgia and opened to the public in 1995 after a 20-month restoration. It was placed on the National Registry Of Historic Places on 03/09/1998.

President Franklin D Roosevelt made use of United States Railcar #1 in late 1942. It was later a part of his funeral train. He had traveled 243,827 miles in 399 trips by rail in his life. It is on display in Miami, Florida. President Harry S Truman later inherited US Railcar #1, used it for his 1948 “Whistle Stop Tour“, and enjoyed running it at 80 mph. The iconic pic of President Truman holding the famous “Dewey Defeats Truman” copy of the Chicago Tribune was taken at the St Louis Union Station.  The term “Whistle Stop” was actually coined by Robert A Taft as an insult to Truman.

President Rutherford B Hayes was the first President to travel Coast To Coast in 1857 after the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad.

President Abraham Lincoln  used a train trip for his inaugural trip in 1861. It took twelve days, and 23 railroads. He later used the Executive Coach “United States” that was built for him in 1865. He was also the first President to use a train for Military purposes as he used it to visit Civil War Battlefields, including to deliver the Gettysburg Address which he put the finishing touches on during the train ride. Like President Harding, and others, it later carried his body home after he was killed by John Wilkes Booth.

On May 28,1886 President Grover Cleveland got engaged, and would later travel with his new bride to their honeymoon spot aboard the B&O Railroad.

President Zachary Taylor rode a riverboat from Louisiana, then a stagecoach to Uniontown, Pennsylvania, by horseback to Cumberland, Maryland, and the B&O Railroad to Washington

In 1853 President Franklin Pierce and his family were traveling on the B&O Railroad, when it derailed, and his son Benny was killed. The White House was always a sad place during his term as a result.

In 1857, President James Buchanan (who succeeded Pierce) rode the B&O Railroad to his Inauguration

President James Garfield was shot twice by Charles Guiteau in July 1881 at the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad station-planning to board a train for vacation but was without his security detail.

President William Henry Harrison was the first president to campaign on a train, as his 5 predecessors never rode them. He also took a train to Washington after he was elected in 1840. But John Quincy Adams was the first to actually ride a train.

President Theodore Roosevelt (before he was President) took lots of train rides on behalf of President William Mckinley. After Mckinley was killed in New York, in 1900, he rode a train to Mckinley‘s funeral. Roosevelt would become the first President with an entire train at his disposal, then dubbed the “Potus (President Of The United States) Train.

The Ferdinand Magellan is a Pullman Standard observation car refitted to serve as living quarters and office for Presidents from 1943-1958. and is on display at the Gold Coast Railroad Museum in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Its last official use was by 1st Lady Mamie Eisenhower in 1954 on her way to cristen the world’s 1st Nuclear Powered Submarine the USS Nautilus in Groton, Connecticut.  President Ronald Reagan used it for a one day tour on 10/12/1984, traveling 120 miles in Ohio, from Dayton to Perrysburg doing Whistle Stop speeches.

President Dwight D Eisenhower campaigned aboard a train. On March 28th, 1969, he died of congestive heart failure. His body was carried aboard a military train on a B&O Railroad baggage car.

President Elect Barack Obama traveled part of President Lincoln’s Inaugural Route in 2009. He used the Georgia 300 car built in 1930, that was also used by President Gorge H.W. Bush for campaigning in 1992.

Prince Charles did a 5 day Whistle Stop Tour of the United Kingdom on 09/06/10.

I hope you have enjoyed this little Whistle Stop Tour back in time looking at connections to our nation’s leaders and the trains they rode.

I’m John Losh, “The Losh-Man“, and as always, I hope that the very first priority in your life is a living, breathing, active relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ, and if you have never come to know Him as your personal Lord & Savior, my prayer is that you will do that today!

And I’ll see you next time here on Legacies…On The Rails!

Revisiting History: Trains Of The Civil War

Welcome back to Legacies…On The Rails! This is my 9th installment for 2017 as we keep rolling down the tracks toward Spring! Today, we will be discussing trains and railroads of the American Civil War. First let me say that these days, I know some find it offensive to discuss any part of our nation’s history that they find suddenly uncomfortable. Well, I find that fact offensive because those who deny, try to blot out or do not understand or learn from history are doomed to repeat it. I will not apologize for visiting this topic and as a matter of a fact, the phrase I personally coined some time ago is: If you don’t understand where you’ve been, you do not truly understand where you are, or where you are going, or why.

I will never dishonor the memory of my ancestors (or yours) that put themselves in harm’s way or even lost their lives generally serving in our armed forces or fighting in any of the battles that have made our nation what it is, by avoiding study of, or discussion of these periods.Denial cannot erase historical facts. I actually make it a daily point to go out of my way to approach and thank any of our active duty military or those wearing their Veteran caps, jackets, etc. Have you thanked a Veteran today? The freedoms we enjoy as Americans are not free. I love the saying these days that only two have offered, or died for you, Jesus Christ, and our American Military! May God continue to bless and keep our Heroes! And though it may be your “right”, those who are choosing not to stand for the presentation of our Nation’s Flag and the National Anthem……you are dishonoring those who have or are currently fighting for your protection, and spitting on the graves of those that have died fighting for you. You disgust me!

Some do not realize just how vital the railroads were in the tumultuous years of the Civil War. Not only in the transportation of men and goods, but in the eventual defeat of the South. The Confederacy simply did not have the financial or material means to adequately maintain the railroads in their area. They only controlled 9,000 miles of trackage, while the North controlled 20,000 miles.

It also did not help that Northern troops were in the regular habit of burning or otherwise destroying rail bridges, (which, though I certainly do not condone slavery then or now, and understand the necessity, as the creator of the Facebook page Railroad Bridges, Related Photos & Video is kind of sad for me to think about). They were also in the habit of pulling up tracks, heating them until they would bend and tying them around trees, creating what was known as “Sherman’s Neckties“. The Union blockades of sea routes also kept the South from being able to obtain vital supplies to maintain the railroads. This all combined to keep Confederates from being able to ship their cotton crop, so they could not woo the help of European nations.

Unemployment rose in southern states as they had to let go of so many railroad workers. Confederates also usually destroyed as much of a town’s rail equipment as possible before retreats were done. I was actually shocked to see that in the beginning of the Civil War, the Confederacy actually controlled 135 railroads. But also in the beginning, in both southern and northern areas, most railroads were short lines that did not connect with continuing tracks, which made truly long distance rail transport difficult.

The Civil War was also the first time that a train mounted gun was ever created and employed, and the first time that train cars were used as makeshift hospitals. Both would continue into the two World Wars.

But fortunately for both sides, though the Confederacy still eventually fell, with the decline of their railroads playing such a huge role, in 1862 President Abraham Lincoln signed into law the Pacific Railway Act, authorizing construction of the Transcontinental Railroad. The Union Pacific built west from Omaha, Nebraska and the Central Pacific Railroad built East from Sacramento, California. The finalization of the Transcontinental Railroad was culminated with a ceremony on May 10th, 1869 as the two lines met in the
city of Promontory, Utah. When President Lincoln drove the Golden Spike to complete the line, it was attached to a telegraph wire that sent the news from coast to coast. It was the spike that was heard around the world. Four more transcontinental roads and 174 million acres for them eventually came to be authorized as well.

Here are a couple of my current reads on this subject at the moment. Nothing Like It In The World: The Men Who Built The Transcontinental Railroad on Amazon at:
https://www.amazon.com/Nothing-Like-World-Transcontinental-1863-1869/dp/0743203178 and The Union Pacific: Birth Of A Railroad check it out at the link:
https://www.amazon.com/Union-Pacific-Railroad-1862-93-Hardcover/dp/B00IGYPKXO/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1488725961&sr=1-1&keywords=Union+Pacific+Birth+Of+A+Railroad .

Probably the most famous American Civil War related railroad story is that of the theft by Union Soldiers and Civilian Scout James J Andrews in Northern Georgia April 12, 1862 of the steam 4-4-0 locomotive known as The General. It was built by Rogers, Ketchum & Grovesner in New Jersey. Part of my personal railroads collection are items related to The General. I have also been to the Walt Disney Hometown Museum in Marceline, Missouri https://www.waltdisneymuseum.org/ (Disney was a huge railfan) and even have friends that are from Marceline. and other friends that have worked the railroads that pass through it. There is a room in the museum almost entirely dedicated the Disney movie The Great Locomotive Chase. I also just purchased the movie on my Google Play Movies collection.

Here is a song about the chase by Robert W Smith that I also found on You Tube:

While the Disney film that starred Fess Parker (Davey Crockett) and Jeffrey Hunter who was the Captain Christopher Pike in the very first Star Trek Pilot: The Cage, was released June 8th, 1956 (cool for me as both my Mother Maureen Losh and my Son John W Losh III were both born in June), there was an earlier version called The General that starred Buster Keaton and Clyde Bruckman, that was released February 5th, 1927 (again cool for me, I was born in February).

I thought of posting the entire lists, but instead I am going to encourage you to do searches on Railroads Of The Civil War as well as books on the same.

I may do a later blog expanding further on this topic but I think we are off to a good start here. Hope you have enjoyed these beginning tidbits of info, and the videos I found and shared about Trains Of The Civil War.

I am going to start a couple new features that will continue from here on in the Legacies…On The Rails Blog and maybe even the Podcast.

The first is a Railroad Equipment Profile. In this feature, I will share pics I have taken of locomotives, freight cars, grain cars, tankers, cabooses, etc and their origins.

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This first installment Of my new Railroad Equipment Profile features the Dome Car Prairie View (Great Northern Railroad Empire Builder #1394 that I recently caught at the Kansas City Union Station. The following information on it’s credit goes to Trainweb.org.

Prairie View” – to BN 3/70 (same number), to Amtrak 9364. Was eventually used as an Amtrak parts car and was sold 5/93 as a shell (less trucks) to the BN. Stored Springfield MO (ex Frisco shops) until sold 1994 to Holland America Westours. After putting over $1m into it, car is now in service in Alaska. It carries the name “Deshka” and entered service in 1997. In 2003 Westours put all but 3 of their Budd domes up for sale as `”excess”. They kept 1394 because it required no coupler pocket modifications for the new Colorado Railcar domes and it has Budd braked trucks (from under one of the two 1956 Budd built Santa Fe business cars that were retrucked with 4 wheel trucks in 1989). Car transferred late 2004 to a new division called Alaska Rail Tours (defunct) with the other retained cars to begin service in 2005 in a non “cruise ship” travel/tour operation in Alaska. Sold 10/09 to Iowa Pacific/San Luis & Rio Grande. Renamed back to original “Prairie View”.

The Second is Railroad Old Time Radio. Anyone that knows me knows that I love old movies, old TV shows, and the radio versions of many of them. We will begin with Episode 17 of Gunsmoke. Set in Dodge City, Kansas, it was billed as the first adult western, and its radio show that starred William Conrad as Marshall Matt Dillon first aired on CBS on April 26th, 1952. (Again, cool for me as both the first date Anniversary and Wedding Anniversary for my wife Denise and I are both in late April (25th/28th respectively). This episode aired September 27th, 1952. My daughter Cara Losh was also born on a much later September 27th. I am loving these connections as I am not a believer in coincidence! Hope you enjoy it. We may start sharing Railroad Movies as well (which I kind of already did by sharing The General with Buster Keaton above.)

Thanks again for joining me! until next time, I want to again encourage you to accept the free gift of Salvation and forgiveness that the Lord Jesus Christ offers you and to follow Him each day of your life. My reading this morning with breakfast was in Romans 9-12 and the verses that stood out to me were Romans 10: 14,15 (NKJV from Bible Gateway)

14 How then shall they call on Him in whom they have not believed? And how shall they believe in Him of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear without a preacher? 15 And how shall they preach unless they are sent? As it is written:“How beautiful are the feet of those who preach the gospel of peace, Who bring glad tidings of good things!”

Well, if I don’t see you down the rail line, if I don’t see you here, I pray I’ll see you In The Air!

CB&Q In Focus Volume 1

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Welcome back to Legacies…On The Rails!

With my Paternal Grandfather John Losh whose namesake I am and his brother Leonard Losh both having been career men with the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, in honor of that fact, one of the railroad related Facebook pages I  created is Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad (Burlington Route).

This year, I began inviting participants in that page to share their own Q stories, or the stories of friends or family members  that worked for the CB&Q, and giving me permission to also share them here on the blog.

Here are some recent stories that have been graciously shared and I would like to express my sincere gratitude to these fine folks for their willingness to share on the Facebook page and allow me to also share them here as well. I plan to make CB&Q In Focus a regular feature here on Legacies…On The Rails  first in 2017 and beyond, as part of my strategy to get more consistent and creative with the blog after only doing 4 postings total in 2016.  I plan to join the Burlington Route Historical Society this year so hopefully, that will lead to many, many more stories to share both here and on  Legacies…On The Rails Radio (Podcast) in the future!

From Joel Stirek:

I grew up on the C B & Q. I lived a mile or so south just off Cass and 63rd. I went to Maercker Grade School btw. I used to ride my bike into Westmont, get some penny candy at the Ben Franklin, and sit in the shelter on the North side of the track watching trains. I loved exploring on my bike and always knew where I was by watching where the tracks were going. I loved watching the freight cars go by with all the railroad adverts, especially from far off destinations. Many more memories and thank you!

From Earl Mc:

I too grew up with the Q. Lived in North Berwyn and would ride the bicycle down to the Q to watch trains. One time in the afternoon I was going to go shopping for my mom at the National Food Store on Oak Park Avenue across from MacNeal Hospital. When I got to the intersection of Oak Park and Stanley Ave which ran parrellel to the tracks on the north side, the gates came down. I could hear the Zephyr coming from the east. I wanted to get a better look so I started to ride my bike across Stanley. I was between a car and the curb. Well the car turned right and I flew over the hood of the car into the middle of the intersection. I was dazed but saw the observation car go by! I got to the side of the street as the gates went up. Had to straighten the baskets on the bike before I could load up the groceries. Mom and dad never did find out about that adventure.

I am always looking for great sites with CB&Q material and as my wife and I took tomorrow off for my 48th Birthday (really, I’m just 29 for the 18th time) and were thinking of a Day Trip for some rail-fanning and thought about St Joseph, Mo and I started researching its railroad connections, found this site:
http://www.stjosephmemorylane.com/railroads/railroads.html . It has tons of CB&Q pics and information, from equipment to Depots, Administrative Offices and more! The very first pic you see is of the CB&Q Silver Charger. It has a list of St Joe related railroad lines including:

CB&Q
Burlington Northern
BNSF
Chicago & Great Western
Chicago & Northwestern
Chicag0, Rock Island & Pacific
Hannibal & St Joseph
Kansas City, Clay County & St Joseph
Missouri Pacific
Northeast Kansas & Missouri
Rock Island
St Joseph Belt (owned by Mo-Pac)
St Joseph & Denver City
St Joseph & Grand Island
St Joseph & Savannah Electric
St Joseph Short Line
St Joseph Terminal
St Joseph & Western
Santa Fe
Union Pacific
Union Terminal

It has lots of great pics and other items related to many of the other railroads in that list.

I encourage you to go check out the site. I plan to email the site owner and see if I can get him to share about the site’s origins.

If you have not checked out my page Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad (Burlington Route), won’t yo do so and send me a Member Request soon?

And until next time, this is John LoshThe Losh-Man“, encouraging you to continue to follow the Lord Jesus Christ every day of your life, and when it comes to trains, Continue Leaving Legacies…On The Rails!

 

A Look Back And A Look Ahead

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Welcome to this first blog post of Legacies…On The Rails 2017! Hope you had a great year overall in 2016 and certainly a great year of railfan fun! I know I did and though I am going to be very brief in this posting because I want you to go listen to the first Legacies…On The Rails Radio (Podcast) of 2017 to get more of the details so you can actually hear them from me, rather than just read them here.

https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/legaciesontherails/episodes/2017-01-19T12_40_23-08_00

But, here are some of my final Legacies On The Rails Fan Videos of 2016:

And some recent photos, from ones that continue to celebrate the Heritage of “The Fallen Flags” to current day railroads:

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But, though you can hear all of these on the podcast, here are a few stats from 2016:

I did railfanning in 20 different cities in 3 states: Missouri, Kansas and Iowa (complete list in the podcast)

I did 82 Legacies On The Rails Fan Videos that got 927 views in 2016. Got up to 233 overall.

I caught 19 different railroads, not counting the countless number of them represented in things like grain trains and other mixed manifests (complete list in the podcast)

I caught 23 different models of locomotives (complete list in the podcast)

I caught 21 different Heritage representing pieces of rail equipment (complete list in the podcast)

There were several firsts: my first all Ferromex grain train, my first live steam locomotive (UP 844), catching the new Kansas City Streetcar, my first Canadian National video and more (complete) list in the podcast)

My Railroad Bridges, Related Photos and Video Facebook group exceeded 1,000 Likes!

My Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad (Burlington Route) Facebook group exceeded 220 members!

So,what’s next for Legacies…On The Rails in 2017:

Again, full list is on the Podcast but:

  1. I am considering joining the Burlington Route Historical Society http://burlingtonroute.com/ and trying to make their spring meet in Batavia, Illinois the weekend of April 7th,8th
  2. Want to continue to add more states and cities to my railfan resume but it may be harder as we just realized The Legacies On The Rails Cruiser: my 2013 Kia Sportage that we bought in December, 2013 as a replacement for my 2007 Ford Focus that someone totaled for me, is now just less than 25,000 miles shy of hitting 100,000 miles and thereby being out of warranty. And that is even with having bought an extended warranty, so I have to watch my miles this year, but we’ll see.
  3. Would like to ride more excursion trains, and document them here, on my Facebook page and on Legacies On The Rails Radio.
  4. Be better about maintaining consistency in this Blog and the podcast as I only did three blogs last year and four episodes of the Podcast. Going to shoot for a minimum of one of each per month. Currently building a list of potential topics. Got a suggestion? Look me up!
  5. Want to start doing more interviews for both the Blog and the Podcast. Currently  building a list of potential guests to approach. Know somebody? Look me up!
  6. See about promotional items: business cards (already have some but not for LOTR specifically) door signs for the LOTR cruiser, having my pics put on shirts, doing a 2018 Calendar.
  7. Continue top develop my trains collection in pics, HO, O and other gauge pieces, (have recently picked up my first two tin train pieces as well as more HO pieces.)Again, full list of What’s Next? and much more is on the Podcast.

    Oh, yeah, and in addition to here, and on Facebook as John W Losh II, and (816)-914-3578, (preferably before 1:30pm CT on weekdays), you can now also reach me at:
    legaciesontherails@gmail.com .

    Until next time, as always, this is John Losh “The Losh-Man” reminding you to continue to follow the Lord Jesus Christ on a daily basis, and when it comes to trains,
    Continue leaving Legacies…On The Rails!

Legacies On The Rails Roadshow Heads East To Historic Lee’s Summit

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Just as promised in my last posting, since I also had a hospital visit to make there, the Legacies On The Rails Road Show destination yesterday was historic Downtown Lee’s Summit, Missouri. Hometown of my buddy Fred Liggett, of the Lee’s Summit Tribune. Anytime that I can visit a depot that is for one of the railroads that I have family history in, that’s always an extra plus for me and since the one there is the former Missouri Pacific Depot, I was thrilled.

Not only that but this has now become another of my favorite regular spots to visit for rail-fanning, as Union Pacific trains, much like they do at the depots I have visited in Weston and Parkville, rumble by there multiple times a day, and my timing was perfect as I had just stepped out of my car when it was clear that my first video catch of the day was upon me, with the blast of a UP 7982’s air horn. Here are both videos that I took during my visit.

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The former Missouri Pacific Depot in Lee’s Summit is third generation. The very first depot was a box-car. Later a wooden building that later burned, and was then replaced by the current brick structure that like the depot in Parkville,housing its Chamber Of Commerce, this one  currently houses the Lee’s Summit Chamber Of Commerce. One of their ladies was kind enough to oblige me in taking my  photo shown above with the caboose that sits next to it. The Depot is currently undergoing renovations. When I asked if someone could share with me about the history of the depot,I was directed to Kathy Smith-Executive Director of the Historical Society Of Lee’s Summit Museum http://www.leessummithistory.net/ .

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Kathy was so gracious in taking time to ask if I needed anything as I looked around the facility, where a Lee’s Summit Veterans display is currently housed, as well as in taking time to share the information I sought with me. I was thrilled to find out that the museum is housed in a former WPA Post Office since I have been studying the 1930’s as I eluded to in my last posting in preparation for doing the 1930’s murder mystery ride wit the St Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern Railway  on 4/25/15.

Kathy shared about how important the railroad has always been to the city of Lee’s Summit. It helped them rebuild after the ravages of the Civil War. A time period that saw the likes of Cole Younger and Bloody Bill Anderson. And Dr Pleasant Lea. Ir brought jobs, and made sure that farmers could ship their goods, receive supplies, and send equipment out for repairs and get it back. It has provided for the transportation of people, and still does today with the Amtrak Missouri River Runner coming through several times a day. It is one of the reasons behind the rich history of Lee’s Summit. History represented by murals like these on buildings around town. Speaking of Cole Younger, Kathy Smith was also well acquainted with our own Cathy Kline of the Cathy Kline Art Gallery, as Cathy Kline also has a Cole Younger mural there in town, which I missed on this trip but hope to catch next time.

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I also found this mural inside the Lee’s Summit Historical Society Museum by Aileen Franklin-which is among many of her circa 1960 Lee’s Summit history murals including The Community Church, The First School, Dr Pleasant Lea, Early Settlers, and The Star Route.

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Unfortunately, like some of my other Legacies On The Rails Road Show trips, a technical issue bit me in that the audio of my conversation with Kathy that I thought recorded and that I planned to upload as Legacies On The Rails-The Podcast Volume Two did not record. Even If I had known this as soon as we were done, she would not have had time for a re-take. I should have taken video to upload to You-Tube as I seemed to be doing well with that on the day. But, more opportunities will come very soon when I return to the Lee’s Summit Historical Society Museum to help bring several railroad artifacts up from their basement to display on the  main floor.

I hope you have enjoyed this snipit of the fabulous history of the railroad in Lee’s Summit, Missouri. I assure you that like my blogs about Kansas City Union Station’s Model Rail Experience, (which I hope to return to soon if my personal schedule allows), there will be much more Lee’s Summit highlights to share in the near future!

I’m John Losh, reminding you to keep leaving Legacies……On The Rails!

Kansas City Union Station Model Rail Experience Weekly Volume Four

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Welcome back to Kansas City Union Station Model Rail Experience Weekly. This is for the week ending March 13th, 2015 and I apologize for my tardiness in getting this posted but I have been dealing with some technical issues. There will not be a blog for the week ending 3/20/15 as I was not at Union Station but was instead meeting with Cathy Kline of the Cathy Kline Art Gallery housed in the former CB&Q Depot in Parkville, Missouri to discuss details for the Legacies On The Rails Art Show that will be held in August, 2015 with the official date yet TBD. I will post an update as soon as possible (has to do wit my work schedule) but I am happy to say that 10% of the proceeds from the sale will benefit the Kansas City Union Station Model Rail Experience! Ted had asked me about looking into a fundraiser for the MRE so there’s a great start!

After I arrived and got the above photos and video from Union Station‘s back lot , I went in to the Model Rail Experience and found Ted Tschirhart and Fritz Gastreich hard at work on model rail road piece repairs-Ted on a steam engine, and Fritz on one of the G Gauge Amtrak passenger cars, repairing a coupling that had come off. Louis Seibel was dealing with some issues with cars on one of the mixed gauges layout tracks.

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I soon discovered something else I thought was cool. I had thought I was the youngest member of the Model Rail Experience volunteer staff, until I met Steve Cassity and his eight-year old son Jaden Cassity. Steve brought Jaden down to the MRE a few years ago, where he became simply enamored with the various model train sets and now Jaden is a volunteer right along with his Dad. Below is Steve, and Jaden is working on righting one of the G Gauge trains that had derailed. Steve and Jaden both commented on how Jaden’s current size is a real advantage because when one of the trains breaks down or derails in part of a layout that would be hard for one of the adults to reach, Steve can simply lift Jaden up over the plexi-glass and let Jordan either retrieve the piece for repair, set the train back on the track, back it up, or pull it forward. Or even simply move a piece that is simply needing transfer from one track or layout to another, return a piece to a track after it leaves the Model Rail Experience Office/Repair Shop. Steve says that Ted has become a great mentor to Jaden who admires Ted very much. There was also a bonus for me in the fact that I got to meet Steve’s brother Fred Cassity, who invited me to come and tour New York Air Brake in Riverside, Missouri where they refurbish braking systems and other parts for trains. I took him up on that on Wednesday 3/18/15 and my next blog posting will cover that. It will actually be the first of likely a series of postings as I make more visits to their facility in the near future.

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So, as usual, a few different things to focus on this session. One of those is yet another of the various scales of model rail layouts that can be found in the Model Rail Experience facility.  this time, it’s N & Z Scale. Here is the wall hanging in the MRE that tells you about the two similar scales, followed by a video that I was able to get.

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Here are  internet links regarding the N & Z Scales. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N_scale
http://www.raildig.com/introduction/beginning/ . There is a local N Scale club, Heartland N Trak of Greater Kansas City https://www.facebook.com/pages/Heartland-N-Trak-of-Greater-Kansas-City/146824552150060?fref=ts that I frequent and that some of our Model Rail Experience volunteers are part of, in case you’d like to check it out.

Next is our guest spotlight. My next door neighbor and Kansas City, Missouri Firefighter John Donnelly recently brought his son to visit the Union Station and the Model Rail Experience and when his wife Tanya Donnelly shared these photos, I requested and was granted permission to share these photos. She said they both had a great time and will definitely come again soon! I so appreciate her willingness to allow  me to share these!

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Next, want to continue to share some of the assorted railroad company pieces we have at the Model Rail Experience, including a Union Station Tribute car, Union Pacific, Santa Fe and Missouri Pacific. Here are some pics and a video for you.

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Again, I hope you’ve enjoyed seeing more of the people-from visitors to volunteer staff, to the displays that make the Kansas City Union Station’s Model Rail Experience a must visit!

I’m John Losh. For Legacies On The Rails, and the Kansas City Union Station Model Rail Experience, thanking you for what you have done in this area and reminding you to continue leaving Legacies…………..On The Rails!

Kansas City Union Station Model Rail Experience Weekly Volume Two

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Welcome back as we head into Kansas City Union Station Model Rail Experience Weekly Volume Two! This edition is for the week concluding on 2/28/15. I hope that since my last posting you have had the opportunity to take your family to visit all the great family activities that your Kansas City Union Station has to offer, including the Model Rail Experience! We are now proud to announce that  Discover Vintage America Magazine‘s March Edition is out and features a tow page spread on pages 14 and 15 that covers in great detail the history of the model railroading hobby as well as how Union Station has evolved to include the Model Rail Experience. You can get copies at your local antique malls, flea markets and more or view it online at http://www.discoverypub.com/feature/index.html . We at the Model Rail Experience would like to express our sincere appreciation to Larry Elmore and Discover Vintage America for doing this wonderful feature! Here is the photo of some of the MRE crew that was featured in the article.

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You hopefully know me well enough by now to know how I started off my day at Union Station last Friday. Looking for the opportunity to get pictures and video of real trains. And, as usual, I was not  disappointed as I got my first Amtrak pics since Locomotive #180 was idling on the tracks by the back lot just waiting for me to share it with you and it wasn’t long before a Union Pacific manifest (guess I said BNSF in the video….my bad) came rumbling by. I wasn’t as close as I would have liked to have been for the video-was actually hoping to get it from the warmth of the Legacies On The Rails Cruiser that you see backed in during the video but I had just come from where you pay to park. Didn’t get all of the train because it was only 10 degrees, I had no gloves with me and my fingers could only take so much.

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I was pleased to discover when I arrived inside the Model Rail Experience that Louis Seibel had just brought in a cart full of boxes…….and boxes of model rail cars, locomotives, cabooses, scenery, tracks and more that had just been donated. Remember, everything at the MRE is by donation, and I’m told there is more to come from this same donor, so we were certainly grateful! Here are the guys beginning to look over it next to the Santa Fe mural painted by Teresa Keene (artshpgrl@yahoo.com) .

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Then, after our usual lunch at the Pierpont’s Restauarant http://www.pierponts.com/ where my favorite (as it is for several others  in the MRE crew) is the Train Burger (and if you come on Fridays it’s cookie day), and I discussed the recent Johnson County Home & Garden Show with Ted, we headed to the basement of Union Station to begin really going through these wares to figure out what there was and was not immediate need for, and what items the members of the crew may want to purchase of the excess for their personal collections (all funds going to the Model Rail Experience). I picked up some HO Scale pieces myself.

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Ok, so I want to focus on a couple of things this week. Last week we focused on the HO Scale Gauge trains. This time, we will focus on the Lionel O & S Scale layout. Then I will show some of my favorite pieces we have from the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad.

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Here is what we have hanging on the wall near the Lionel O &S Scale layout, and an overall view of said layout.

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Here are a couple of pics from the layout, starting with something I currently love to visit in real life, a caboose display. Then there is a caboose from Kansas City Southern that my wife’s paternal grandfather worked for, as did some of his sons, One of them is still in current service with KCS. The caboose bug recently bit me as I think they are cool and now that they are rarely ever used anymore and most are just on display here around KC, around Missouri and all over the country.

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Here are some KCS box cars that are part of the Lionel S & O Gauge layout, along with a replica of the exact cable car that is on display out in the back lot of Kansas City Union Station, where I take my pics and video both before and after I come work my volunteer hours at the Model Rail Experience. Here is something from the internet about  O Gauge trains. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O_scale .

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Here are some of our Chicago, Burlington & Quincy pieces. I also hope that we will see some of you at the Mid America Train & Toy Show at the KCI Expo Center tomorrow. We will not have a table there but many of the Model Rail Experience staff attend the show, both to pick up items for our own personal collections, as well as to scout potential pieces for the MRE layouts. http://www.midamericatrainandtoyshow.com/ .

Until next time, go check out KC’s Union Station and the Model Rail Experience. I’m famous for saying this during times I’ve done part time radio in the past-You’ll be glad ya’ did! I’m John Losh, reminding you to keep leaving Legacies………………..On The Rails!

Legacies On The Rails Road Show Has Busy End To February

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The last week of February proved to be a busy and fun experience for the Legacies On The Rails Road Show. It started with me planning to take a solo trip to Warrensburg, Missouri on Sunday, 2/22/15 to visit my Cousin Renita Tilton who was in the hospital there with cancer (would appreciate your prayers for her and her family) and do a bit of Road Show or general rail-fan stops along the way. But then my wife and daughter wanted to come along and also go visit my son John who attends the University Of Missouri, lives and works in Columbia. This was initially due to the fact that my wife thought Warrensburg was a lot closer to Columbia then they are, so what would have been maybe a four hour excursion for me, turned into a twelve hour day for the three of us. But it was worth it.

So, after having breakfast with John at the Columbia IHOP, we headed back toward Warrensburg. But not before stopping a couple places along the way. The first was the former Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad Depot in Downtown Columbia that is now the Shiloh Bar & Grille.

Next it was on to another former MKT Depot in Booneville, Missouri. Unfortunately, it was not open to allow us access to see what is on display inside, but we were able to enjoy the sight of this beautiful Spanish style building’s exterior as well as the MKT 134 Caboose that is on display outside and get some pictures and video.

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And, of course, you already saw the caboose by itself at the start of this posting. Then after visiting my Cousin in the hospital, the next stop before heading back to Kansas City was the former Missouri Pacific Railroad Depot, currently used by Amtrak, BNSF and Union Pacific in Downtown Warrensburg. It opened in 1889-the same year that the former CB&Q Depot that I recently posted about in Parkville, Missouri that currently houses the Parkville Area Chamber as well as the Cathy Kline Art Gallery https://www.facebook.com/cathyklinefineart was built. Stop in and check it out and stayed tuned to Legacies On The Rails for updates on the Legacies On The Rails Art Show that we hope to have take place there in early Summer. Unfortunately, though the Amtrak/BNSF/UP Depot building was open and I did, as you can see in the video, take a quick look inside, there was no one there to tell me about the depot and no trains coming or going at present. But I did help myself to the Amtrak Vacations Magazine that was part of the free literature they had available.

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On Monday, 2/23/15, I headed back to Parkville, Missouri briefly and caught these BNSF and Union Pacific videos.

Then on Wednesday, 2/25/15, Jordan Gallacher and I headed up to Weston, Missouri to visit the former CB&Q Depot that currently houses the Weston City Hall, has some great CB&Q items on display including some that belonged to my friend Craig Coffey’s father during his days with the CB&Q Railroad and has a caboose on display that was originally a Union Pacific car but is now painted in the green & yellow Burlington-Northern scheme.It was painted this way and moved to Weston after the family of Ed Kirk, a Burlington-Northern Engineer who was killed in a car accident on his way to work (like my grandfather John Losh of the CB&Q was killed on his way home from work in Keokuk,Iowa in 1964), wanted something to honor Ed’s memory, bought it in St Joseph, Missouri, had it moved to Weston and BN paid to have it put on rails.

Unfortunately, the video I took there of City Clerk Kim Kirby telling us about the depot and the rail videos I got of Union Pacific and BNSF trains rumbling through Weston and one of them as it passed the depot were lost when Jordan and I returned to my home after the trip, and I thought I had all the pics and video saved to my computer and started the upload process of the videos to You Tube, removed my camera’s memory card from my computer and cleared it. But I had saved the photos. And, as my friend Craig (who also told me the Ed Kirk story) said, that just means a repeat visit to Weston in the near future.

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There are more pics, but they are on Jordan’s camera. And,on our way to take Jordan home to Liberty, got this video of a UP manifest from the Richfield Rd bridge over the tracks just north of the Canadian Pacific Depot in Liberty. I was busy trying to take pics without using my zoom (didn’t realize digital zoom mode was off and kept getting blurry photos when zooming) that I missed the lead locomotive of the three engine set.)

I wrapped up the week with my now usual Friday morning volunteer session at the Model Rail Experience at Kansas City‘s Union Station, but I will cover that later this week in Kansas City Union Station Model Rail Experience Weekly-Volume Two.

My Legacies On The Rails Road Show destination for this week, on Thursday 3/5/15 accompanied this time by my daughter Cara Losh will be the former CB&Q Depot in Chillicothe, Missouri and a lunch get together for Cara and I with my Cousin George Hess, also a  former railroader.

Well, as usual, let’s close with some railroad music-this time with Arlo GuthrieThe City Of New Orleans

Until next time, I’m John Losh encouraging you to keep leaving Legacies…………On The Rails!